Cityscape by Richard Dewhirst

REVIEW of Downtown-LA, the early years: This week, we introduce jet-setter, fine art photographer Richard Dewhirst as Artist of the Week

This shot of the distinctive DowntownLA skyline was taken by the reflection surrounding the LA DWP building. It’s a spectacular sight and a perfect place to drink-in the view because you get two for the price of one! (Rich)

TribeLA Magazine Acrostic Interview.1

Tag line: Give yourself and your work a tagline

You’ll remember when I shoot you.

Rest: How do you spend your time off?

I like to re-charge by visiting my family and friends back in the UK. While I’m over there I’ll often take in other parts of Europe. Before moving to the US, I loved Europe but was so accustomed to the ancient architecture and rich history everywhere that the relative newness of America seemed fresh, brave, exciting, and appealing. After 18 years in LA, I look at Europe through fresh eyes and the complacency has now worn off. I appreciate both equally.

Influence: What would you like to share with our audience and what effect do you hope to achieve?

I deliberately chose a range of images to showcase my preferred genres, i.e., portraits, headshots, cityscapes and landscapes. I really hope sharing these samples of my work will inspire people, whether it’s as the catalyst to pick up a camera and become passionate about photography or to visit and enjoy the locations I was lucky enough to shoot.

Back: If you could choose a past literary/art/music movement to be a part of, which would you choose and why?

Honestly, I’m happy to be where I am. It’s an incredibly eclectic time and it seems like inspiring creativity is more diverse and accessible than ever. While virtual reality represents an exciting new digital frontier, we have artists like Andy Goldsworthy and Banksy who are tapping into something more primal. From a photography standpoint I like the convenience and creative possibilities granted by digital. I appreciate the work of film aficionados but the extra time and cost associated with it are, at least to me, limiting factors.

If you forced me to pick a past movement, then I’d say the Land Art movement of the 70s, pioneered by the likes of Michael Heizer, Walter De Maria, Robert Smithson, and Nancy Holt. They rejected the commercialization of art and the limitations of gallery settings in favor of connecting their art with nature and in particular the vast emptiness of deserts. A few years ago I visited Spiral Jetty, Sun Tunnels, and Double Negative, three of the most famous installations, and it occurred to me that the journey to reach such pieces of art becomes part of the work itself.

To see more of Richard’s work, start a dialog or discuss a project, visit his website and Instagram:, or Instagram @radical_snaps

Richard Dewhirst, chief creative photographer at Radical Snaps represents the convergence of a deep-rooted passion for photography and a commitment to unique, memorable, high quality imagery.

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