Luis at Tia Chucha Books

The Wandering Song: Central American Writing in the United States is a multi-genre collection of poems, short stories, essays, memoir, novel excerpts, and creative nonfiction. The book showcases writers who render a multiplicity of experiences as refugees from the wars of the 1980s to those who barely remember the homeland, or who were born in el norte. READ MORE

Harley and Me by Bernadette Murphy

We look to George. Was that a gun? “Could be hunting season,” he speculates, eyebrows lifted. “Or maybe there’s a shooting range nearby.” The sharp cracks come more frequently. Multiple shooters. Whoever they are, they seem to be moving closer.

We all go by certain assumptions that we live in a largely civil, law-abiding society. Still, it’s hard not to flash back on the final scenes of Easy Rider with its denouement of casual, explosive violence against the free-spirited, live-and-let-live cross-country riders. But that was only a movie, right? Right?

I glance at Emily for an assuring look that will confirm I’m overreacting. But her widened eyes and the taut set of her jaw tell me she’s frightened, too. READ MORE

Amanda Gorman, US Poet Laureate

“It’s fantastic to be a poet in L.A., and to be an Angeleno.” That’s right, our country’s chosen wordsmith is one of our city’s own. Amanda Gorman was born near Los Angeles International Airport, fitting considering she has wings rivaling any aircraft’s. Her path to poet laureate began “at the cross-section of diametrically opposed neighborhoods; READ MORE

Andre Hardy

For instance, whenever I wear hoodies, I find myself suspicious of my right hand, wondering if it might steal the money from my left pocket. With that in mind, who knew what stereotype would be triggered if Tiny Hands started using foul-mouthed locker room talk? I was pretty sure it wouldn’t be Sambo, Coon or good ole’ Stepin Fetchit, who was television’s favorite Negro, back when America was Great. READ MORE

Miss Annie

Miss Annie: Sometimes the Judge does get quite morose. It’s something to do with his Welsh roots. I find it useful to come and sit on his foot. This way it’s difficult for him to ignore me, and he can’t really get up and walk away. He usually gives in and starts to stroke my head. That’s when I know I’ve got him. READ MORE

Harley and Me paperback bookcover

Murphy wrote a book that is riveting, intimate, and a fun read. Learning about our four brain chemicals that determine our personality traits is interesting however, I found Murphy’s personal experience even more intriguing. Not every woman is going to embrace mid-life on a Harley, but living vicariously through Murphy’s travels gives us insight into what it means to embrace mid-life rather than complain about it. Her story and her book is compelling. What a joy it was to spend an afternoon in my easy chair riding on a bike with Bernadette Murphy. READ MORE

Mystery novelist Davis MacDonald aka Don Davis

According to MacDonald, “The Judge has a legal mind. He’s trained as a lawyer, as I am. If you go to a good law school – I went to USC, and I was number one in my class – they don’t teach you to pass the bar, they don’t teach you to practice law, they teach you a different way to think.” It is that difference that makes The Judge a well-defined, three-dimensional character, able to approach investigations from the perspective of the legal mind. “He’s a clever and experienced guy, but a judge no longer. READ MORE

The Bay by Davis MacDonald

He’d brought his favorite toy car down to drive on their working vacation. The Jag was a convertible, racing green, 1969, vintage. His tried and true toy since he bought it from the original owner back in 1989. He loved the car. Except for the Lucas electrical system, which he overlooked, the way a proud parent overlooks a club foot….

There had been a day when he’d felt swashbuckling in the car. Younger and slimmer then. It was hard to remember back. He had only faded shadows of memories of what it’d been like. Realistically the Judge had always been too tall for the car. And now he was too old and too fat as well. The convertible top was already down, by necessity. He unsnapped the tonneau over its cockpit on the driver’s side, then knelt down, squeezing his bulk in and under the wooden steering wheel, struggling with a two piece seat belt that both went around his waist and came down over his shoulder, a new innovation back in the day. READ MORE

Linda Albertano, Arlondriah Lenyea, Heather Rabun, Glenn Rodriguez

This year’s DADA theme, “EYE FOR A LIE,” features work that examines the concept of “fake” everything—questioning the very essence of truth in what some have labeled the “post-truth” era.

We caught up with Linda Albertano to get the low-down about DADA, what it means, what it does, how she became a DADAist, and the theme of this year’s new LA-DADA book release (Maintenant11). READ MORE

Nearly Fatal Women with Richard Modiano

The Reasonable Woman is a hope chest, a locked cabinet.

The Reasonable Woman is pleasant enough.

The Reasonable Woman is the converse of sex.

The Reasonable Woman is durable good, a sound diagnosis.

The Reasonable Woman is a subordinate clause.

The Reasonable Woman is childproof, although Heidi is already up to her knee.

The Reasonable Woman is a skillet, a war bond.

The Reasonable Woman is a fugue heard on the intercom.

The Reasonable Woman is a graph of stock options, the percentage of return.

The Reasonable Woman is open to suggestion.

The Reasonable Woman is a string bean, a cauliflower, a field of potatoes. READ MORE

Linda J. Albertano

Photo by Alexis Rhone Fancher
As a poet, Linda represented Los Angeles at the One World Poetry Festival in Amsterdam, and she’s featured on the Venice Poetry Wall at Windward Ave. with such local notables as Jim Morrison, Viggo Mortensen and Exene Cervenka.

VIRTUE
Virtue rides into town on a
convertible Clydesdale. She’s wrapped
in blue-and-white
stars
and is eating an apple concoction.
Ah, Virtue! They want
you.
Your symbols
are so succulent! They want to use
you
for purposes of personal
adornment. They want to pin
you,
wholesome and lovely, to their lapels.

Read more of this poem at: READ MORE