Lit

Literary Arts for TribeLA Magazine include, books, booksellers, authors, poets, screen-writers, columnists, essayists, and playwriters

Branches by Rhiannon McGavin

Rhiannon McGavin is Youth Poet Laureate of Los Angeles (2016), and a current English major at UCLA. Her first collection of poetry, Branches, was published in 2017 with Penmanship Books. She has performed her original poetry from the Hollywood Bowl to the Library of Congress, and makes creative writing more accessible through her online work. READ MORE

Rhiannon McGavin, Youth Poet Laureate

In my kindergarten art class, sunlight dripped through finger paint covered windows.
I learned the primaries, red blue yellow, you could make the whole rainbow from just three colors.
you’re older when you tell yourself you only looked at female anatomical models for reference
but this girl made me understand why they say, pretty as a painting. … READ MORE

Honey Suckle Kisses by Synthia SAINT JAMES

You were so stunningly radiant
magically majestic
yet so very real
when I first laid eyes on you
The soft light in the dimly lit room
highlighted and tenderly
embraced your face
like in an exquisite oil painting
from another period
time and place
The essence of the Renaissance
mixed with a touch
of the French Impressionist …
READ MORE

Smitten for Mr. Write by Janice Bremec Blum

In my hand are a dozen helium balloons clunking me on the head and a peach cobbler is teetering in the crux of my arm. I’m struggling to get the key in the front door of my bookstore, The Book Bin. The balloons will decorate the outside sandwich board announcing today’s book signing event. Barton Wallace, the number one male author in the romance genre will be here to autograph his latest book, My Woman. I’ve been a fan of Barton ever since his first book, Together, We, hit the New York Times best seller list. I’ve read… READ MORE

Photo by Arlene Mejorado

Pasadena’s Vroman’s Bookstore “Walk of Fame” dedication to Luis Rodriguez by Luis J. Rodriguez In two years, I spoke or read poetry to an estimated 25,000 people in over 200 events, and millions more in English and Spanish language TV, radio, publication, and Internet media. My press, Tia Chucha Press, released the largest poetry anthology of L.A.-area poets called “Coiled Serpents: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles,” edited by Neelanjana Banerjee, Daniel A. Olivas, and Ruben J. Rodriguez. One of the poems I wrote for the city, “Love Poem to Los Angeles,” was read on KPPC-FM and published in Rattle READ MORE

The Wandering Song, Tia Chuca Press

The Wandering Song: Central American Writing in the United States, Tia Chucha Press, 2017 (Northwestern University Press distributor) Prelude by Leticia Hernández-Linares LA MISIóN, SAN FRANCISCO November 28, 2016 HOME WAS BEHIND US, always somewhere else. Born into 1970s Los Angeles, a few months after my parents arrived in the United States, I experienced El Salvador as a distant place we referred to as “back home.” Civil war disappeared the pos- sibility of return, and yet, my parents’ country transplanted itself within the walls of this other home, colored our beans, determined our verb conjugations and our difference. “Back home” shadowed our lives here; my parents READ MORE

Luis Rodriguez at Tia Chua Press

The Wandering Song: Central American Writing in the United States is a multi-genre collection of poems, short stories, essays, memoir, novel excerpts, and creative nonfiction. The book showcases writers who render a multiplicity of experiences as refugees from the wars of the 1980s to those who barely remember the homeland, or who were born in el norte. READ MORE

Harley and Me by Bernadette Murphy

Harley and Me: Embracing Risk on the Road to a More Authentic Life By Bernadette Murphy Prologue (Previously published May 31, 2017) Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go. —T. S. Eliot The day is finally starting to soften with the onset of evening as a storm assembles to the southeast. The sun has been scorching my retinas all day and is just now starting to dim. I’ve been riding my motorcycle more than eight hours today, winding first through the stunning canyons of Utah, veering into Idaho for a bit, and now entering the READ MORE

Borrowed Bones by Luis Rodriguez

People’s Sonnet #1 by Luis Rodriguez A shadow hangs where my country should glow. Despite glories shaped as skyscrapers or sound. More wars, more prisons, less safe, still low. Massive cities teeter on shifting ground. Glittering lights, music tracks hide the craven. TV, movies, books so we can forget. Countless worn out, debt-laden and slaving; Their soul-derived destinies unmet. Give me NASCAR, lowriders, Hip Hop, the Blues. Give me Crooklyn, cowboys, cool jazz, cholos. Give me libraries, gardens of the muse. Give me songs over sidewalks, mad solos. Big America improperly sized. Give me your true value, realized. Excerpt from Borrowed Bones (Northwestern University Press, READ MORE

Interviewed by Barbara Lieberman Luis Rodriguez knows that Los Angeles is a “great poetry town.” His tenure as Poet Laureate went from 2014 to 2016. It may have come to an end but for Rodriguez, it’s just the beginning. Having published a new book of poetry with Curbstone Books/Northwestern University Press called, Borrowed Bones, he is currently working on another book that will be a collection of essays. In addition, he’s been working as a script consultant for the FX TV show Snowfall, co-created by John Singleton. And if that isn’t enough for this busy man, Rodriguez continues to teach creative writing in two maximum-security READ MORE

Bernadette Murphy and Izzy take a break

By deborah granger Feature photo by Adrienne Helitzer/Still productions Author Bernadette Murphy is not only a master of words, having written several well-regarded books, but in busting down the confines of self-imposed comfort zones. Risk is not just a Hasbro board game, for Murphy, it’s a new way to embrace life for post-child bearing women. But, then there is Fear. We all have it in some way shape or form, but not everyone deals successfully with this sometimes-debilitating emotion. For Murphy, the definition of fear is an acronym for False Evidence Appearing Real. “Fear gets worse as we age,” says Murphy, “My fear does. I have READ MORE

Amanda Gorman, US Poet Laureate

by Natalie Durkin “It’s fantastic to be a poet in L.A., and to be an Angeleno.” That’s right, our country’s chosen wordsmith is one of our city’s own. Amanda Gorman was born near Los Angeles International Airport, fitting considering she has wings rivaling any aircraft’s. Her path to poet laureate began “at the cross-section of diametrically opposed neighborhoods; the economically stable and largely black population of Ladera Heights, the cultural vibrancy of Inglewood, the rich and sprawling Ballona Wetlands and blue Marina lining the sea.” Gorman attended middle school in Malibu and high school in Santa Monica. Trekking up, down, and around the coast cemented READ MORE

The Hill by Davis MacDonald

Miss Annie: Sometimes the Judge does get quite morose. It’s something to do with his Welsh roots. I find it useful to come and sit on his foot. This way it’s difficult for him to ignore me, and he can’t really get up and walk away. He usually gives in and starts to stroke my head. That’s when I know I’ve got him. READ MORE