Hiroshima/Nagasaki Memorial project by Sandy Bleifer

The Hiroshima/Nagasaki Memorial Project traveled to 3 cities in the U.S. (Los Angeles, Honolulu and Berkeley) and 3 cities in Japan (Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Osaka). At all the venues, the exhibition was supported by local community groups backed by their local leaders. The exhibitions were all accompanied by community and educational programs, and in San Francisco and Honolulu, site-specific dance performances were created for the exhibit. This highly moving performance created for the exhibition by the Iona Pear Dance Theatre (now known as the Iona Contemporary Dance Theater) took place in conjunction with the exhibition at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu.Read More →

Hurricane from the Devastation series by Sandy Bleifer

The Devastation Series – by representing and replicating natural process on static works of art and juxtaposing the artwork with the processes at work in nature, underscores the current environmental crisis. The video shows how the work was inspired by nature and also imbues the artwork (which endures after the moving images on the screen are gone) with the power and magnitude of what has been revealed. Read More →

A small portion of Stone's Stones by Sandy Bleifer

Since I have been a lifetime student of classical music (piano), which involves an understanding of music composition, it occurred to me that musical compositions are built upon patterns of theme and variation. Since that epiphany, I have structured several works on classical music forms.Read More →

Graffiti Wall 35 by Sandy Bleifer

Multiple layers of paper were collaged creating two separate structures divided by the chicken wire, which supports the front layer. The many layers of papers and the obliterated graffiti testify to a long history of the wall. Wile the bold graffitii Eric Fisher painted seems to dominate the piece, it has a lot of competition from the wall surfaces. Read More →

Paper becoming me by Sandy Bleifer

This is one of a series of 15 pieces cast from a plaster of Paris mold of my face in 1985. The series demonstrates the hidden qualities of Hosho, a paper used in Japan for wood block printing, which I discovered is capable of picking up fine detail from the mold when wet, and retaining the form when dry. The rectangular format reminds the viewer of the original sheet of paper and the “paper-ness” of the sculpture.Read More →